Rugs come in all shapes, sizes and colours therefore need to be treated individually.
They are all manufactured in different ways—the fibres vary from silk, wool, polypropylene/acrylic, nylon to viscose, rayon and art silk.

How do I find out when to clean my rug?

The best thing to do is give us a call 0418 690 829 to arrange a time for us to call by and have a look—this way we can see the age/condition of the rugs needing a clean and advise you if we think any stains/marks are likely to clean off or whether they’ll be permanent. This way you will not waste your money attempting to clean something that won't come up to your or our expectations.

Soiling V Staining:

A soiled spot on the carpet has the appearance of a stain, but is not necessarily the result of a spill. Soiling is the result of a residue or oily substance on the carpet fibres, which then attracts dirt particles. These spots generally clean out.

A stain is the most common concept of a discoloured spot on the carpet. A stain occurs when a substance has come into contact with the carpet, and embeds itself into the fibres. For example food colouring will dye a wool carpet. Most people understand that a cup of hot coffee spilled on a carpet could leave behind a stain.

Natural Fibres:

The natural fibres of silk and wool tend to clean very well providing they don’t have protein stains that are very difficult to remove. Protein stains are things like egg, milk, vomit (pet or human). Wool is less stain resistant than most synthetic fibres. Wool is very absorbent, so it can be difficult to remove stains once they have been absorbed by the fibre. If the substance is allowed to soak into the fibre, it may not come out.

As with all fibres, the best method of preventing a stain when a spill happens is to treat the spill as quickly as possible. If the substance is allowed to soak into the fibre, it may not come out.

Nylon:

Nylon is a very absorbent fibre, so to prevent spills from sinking deep into the fibres and leaving stains, it must be protected with a stain treatment. Advances in stain treatment technologies mean that today’s nylons are more stain resistant than ever before.

As with all fibres, the best method of preventing a stain when a spill happens is to treat the spill as quickly as possible. If the substance is allowed to soak into the fibre, it may not come out.

Polypropylene/Acrylic:

Artificial fibres such as polypropylene or olefin as it is sometimes labelled tends to clean well also. Olefin is hydrophobic, meaning that it does not absorb liquid. However, olefin’s weakness for oils means that any oil-based spill or residue will not easily be cleaned from the carpet’s fibres. Because of this, olefin is not recommended in areas susceptible to spills of oily substances, such as kitchens or dining rooms. If you have an olefin carpet, wearing socks or slippers can reduce the transfer of oil from the bottoms of your feet. (This is good advice for all types of carpet.)

Viscose, Rayon or Art Silk:

We sometimes come across rugs with a fibre labelled viscose, rayon or art silk. These rugs don’t clean well and any agitation tends to dislodge the fibres therefore can destroy the look of the rug.

Warning—Colour Fastness:

Another problem we find with some rugs are that they are not colour fast—i.e. the colours run and bleed into each other when moisture is added. Especially rugs purchased over seas—the dying process used on the fibres can be a bit suspect leaving the colours unstable.